The average SAT reading score for the graduating class of 2011—497—is the lowest since 1972. 

 

 AAMP UP READING

 

The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for English Language Arts and Literacy are organized into six categories:

 

1. Reading: Literature

2. Reading: Informational Texts

3. Reading: Foundational Skills

4. Writing

5. Speaking and Listening

6. Language

 

 

This page provides resources for the

reading, speaking and listening standards.

 

NOTE: Publishes offer a dizzying array of compelling and formidable choices to support teachers. Please go to their websites to consider additional CCSS support materials. Most of their websites include videos and free resources designed to help teachers choose products that reflect their personal needs and interests. Because of the nature of literacy, many of these same resources may appear on the AAMP UP Writing Page. Below are just a few of the many resources available to teachers.

 

 

WHAT TO TEACH:

Common Core Curriculum Standards

 

Common Core State Standards Initiative:


Navigating Implementation of the
Common Core State Standards:


 Pathways to the Common Core: Accelerating Achievement:

 

WHAT TO READ:
BOOK LISTS AND EXEMPLARS: One author raved that one of the most powerful aspects of Common Core Standards were the “lists” of books. This link gives examples, not only of book lists, but also of grade level exemplars and activities. Very helpful site.

http://www.corestandards.org/assets/Appendix_B.pdf

 

LUCY CALKINS: Ms. Calkins has been a long-time visionary promoting literacy. This comprehensive website provides extensive materials for CCSS, book lists, and multiple grade appropriate free resources.

http://tc.readingandwritingproject.com/

 

TERI LESENE: READING LADDERS: This book discreetly addresses the need to inspire students to try increasingly challenging literature. Ms. Lesene organizes books in “ladders”, based on student interest, then “ladders” them by complexity. A marvelous resource for teachers seeking ideas on “what to read”:

http://www.heinemann.com/products/E01726.aspx

 

THE GREAT BOOKS FOUNDATION: Rated by teacher unions and professionals as one of the most comprehensive reading/writing and discussion programs. Students engage in careful reading, thoughtful writing, and spirited inquiry discussions. Provides specific training on how to “cite” texts and defend positions.

http://www.greatbooks.org/

Power Point developed by Todd Jeffrey, Oregon Association for Talented and Gifted on GREAT BOOKS and Socratic Seminar:

http://authenticteaching.com/presentations/Socratic%20Dialogue%20PDF.pdf

 

 

 

HOW TO ACHIEVE CCSS

Increasing intensity of reading and levels of teaching

READWRITHETHINK

A comprehensive website offering K-12 classroom resources that guide teachers to purposeful reading, writing and discussion across all content areas. Includes links to International Reading Association videos.

 

ENGLISH COMPANION ING:

An online professional community for English teachers and those who support them. Now that CCSS asks other content areas to share literacy responsibilities, this website will intrigue all teachers. There, teachers will find tools, tips and techniques to help them in all areas of literacy. Founded by author Jim Burke. This website is free, but you have to formally join through Mr. Burke’s website:

 

 

 

COMMON CORE CURRICULUM MAPS, (COMMON CORE SERIES) : K-12, funded by a research grant from Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Includes complete units based on increasingly difficult books, recommended teaching strategies to guide students through deep reading, discussion and writing, available digitally. http://tinyurl.com/7pjhk8z


   

GRETHCHEN OWOCKI:

THE COMMON CORE LESSON BOOK K-5

(http://www.heinemann.com/products/E04293.aspx

A comprehensive “training model” addressing how to work with increasingly complex literature, informational text and foundational skills. It also covers writing, speaking and listening and language. A powerful resource for teachers looking to adjust their teaching and curriculum around CCSS. Contains instructional strategies on how to “demonstrate teaching, develop collaborative engagement and produce high quality independent practice.” Abundant

ready-to-use lesson formats. Perfect for Professional Learning Communities, and any teacher or administrator looking to “quick start” themselves on how to best provide a balanced and manageable approach to successfully implement CCSS.

 

RICHARD BEACH, AMANDA HAERTLING THEIN, AND ALLEN WEBB: TEACHING TO EXCEED ENGLISH LANGUAGE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS:

http://www.taylorandfrancis.com/books/details/9780415808088/

A powerful, exciting resource, jam-packed with ideas and strategies to exceed standards: Moves the CCSS framework into a view that literacy is a contextualized, social practice, challenges simplistic models that homogenize adolescent learners, adds the important element of critical literacy to English language arts classrooms, provides specific examples of teachers in action implementing these practices. It has an Interactive Companion Website with student and instructor resources. The Website is designed to foster interactivity through participation in an online teaching planning simulation with a text, video, or case on one side of the screen and a chat box for instructors and students to share their reactions and planning ideas. The Companion Website is linked to a wiki that serves as a repository for links, activities/units, and further reading.

See their innovative “Literary Worlds” http://brn227.brown.wmich.edu/literaryworlds/index.html

LiteraryWorlds.org as an example of their literature based “virtual world based on complex novels. Please visit the companion website for this book at

www.routledge.com

 

KELLY GALLAGER: Author of the definitive book on the importance of teaching students to love reading through authentic tasks, READICIDE, http://tinyurl.com/cogsfv he follows up with an equally powerful book, DEEPER READING, COMPREHENDING CHALLENGING TEXTS 4-12: providing classroom-tested strategies that enable students to: accept the challenge of reading difficult texts, consciously monitor their comprehension, employ fix it strategies, think metaphorically, etc. The publisher’s link allows you to preview the book online: http://tinyurl.com/4xt9c3s

 

 

JIM BURKE: 6-12. Teacher, Burlingame High School, California. Founder of the critically acclaimed website “English Companion: Where “English teachers go to help each other”. http://englishcompanion.ning.com/ This website was the winner of the 2010 Edublogs and provides: “A place to ask questions and get help. A community dedicated to helping you enjoy your work. A cafe without walls or coffee: just friends. Visit his website for a wealth of free resources including a link to his favorite websites through Dingo. A must web site if you are an AP English Teacher. All his books provide training in how to interact with text. They are  EXTRAORDINARY RESOURCES for teachers needing guidelines on creating powerful questions, and strategic focus when reading, guiding students to discover the BIG IDEAS. Two resources to consider:

 

 

 

JIM BURKE: WHAT’S THE BIG IDEA? Question-Driven Units to Motivate Reading,Writing, and Thinking: Examples of Big Idea Discussion Topics to guide thinking and writing (6th Grade): What do you fear most? Can first impressions be trusted? What if your whole world changed? How powerful is loyalty? Does nature demand respect? When is there strength in numbers? Have you ever been fooled? Who would you be if you could be someone else?

http://www.heinemann.com/products/E02157.aspx

 

JIM BURKE: ESSENTIAL LESSONS; TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES FOR TEACHING ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS:

 

 

 

NOTE: FOR HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS: THIS RESOURCE BASED ON POWER AND CORE STANDARDS! AUTHOR’S NOTE: “Anchored in standards shared by a range of national literacy documents, these lessons focus on the core academic skills—reading, writing, speaking and listening, taking notes, taking tests, and managing oneself-required to succeed in class, on state tests and college entrance exams, and in future endeavors. Whether used as a supplement to enhance your English L http://www.heinemann.com/shared/covers/0325008574.jpg" height="176" hspace="12" width="237" align="left"> anguage Arts curriculum or as a stand-alone resource, 50 Essential Lessons will help you teach your students academic essentials. Click on this link to see the list of 50 tools, lessons and texts:

http://www.50essentiallessons.com/contents.asp#ab

 

STEPHAN HARVEY ANDANNE GOUDVIS:

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL K-8

STRATEGIES THAT WORK-SECOND EDITION

Free PDF file outlining strategic reading strategies: www.stenhouse.com/pdfs/strats2guide.pdf

 

Many helpful strategies, including capturing inner conversations about text on the text or on sticky notes. This is just one of many outstanding resources developed by these authors.

    

 

 

JEFFRY D. WILHELM: ENGAGING READERS AND WRITERS WITH INQUIRY: This excellent resource provides examples of guiding questions for every content area; planning guidelines and sample inquiry units, research-based tips for cultivating rich productive discussion, secret prompts, walkarounds, and dozens of activities that deepen reading and writing, etc.

http://tinyurl.com/93b6nq3

Study Guide for Engaging Readers and Writers With Inquiry: http://tinyurl.com/8h8z72l

 SPENCER KAGAN’S: BALANCED LITRACY
SHARON SKIDMORE AND JILL GRABER
http://tinyurl.com/cddgbvh

One of Mr. Kagan’s most helpful resources to intensify engagement and understanding of a variety of CCSS literacy anchors. Highly engaging materials to promote thinking, writing and discussing. These authors have created separate books for K, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. For example, the Grade 5 book creates cooperative activities to train Reading Metacognition, Thinking About Thinking Strategies:

    • ClarifyingConnecting
    • Deciding What Is Important
    • Evaluating
    • Inferring
    • Monitoring
    • Predicting
    • Prior Knowledge
    • Purpose Setting
    • Questioning
    • Responding Emotionally
    • Retelling or Summarizing
    • Visualizing


SPENCER KAGAN: See this link for multiple literacy resources:

http://tinyurl.com/cqelhup

 

 

 

 

PURPOSEFUL DISCUSSON:

COOPERATIVE LEARNING: Discussion requires 100% participation for it to be effective. All of Dr. Spencer Kagan’s Cooperative Learning Structures are designed to “guide the interaction of students with each other, the curriculum and the teacher.” Dr. Kagan has created over 200 structures, that make it difficult for a student to “opt out” of a discussion”. Although his books provide very detailed explanations on how to implement cooperative learning effectively, no book by itself can substitute for explicit training. See: http://www.kaganonline.com/index.php
for resources and training. The ten most structures used for discussion are:

Numbered Heads Together

Fan-N-Pick

Quiz-Quiz-Trade

Inside-Outside Circle

RoundRobin

RoundTable

RallyCoach

Showdown

Three-Step Interview

Timed Pair Share

 

Explanation of these structures:

http://edtech.kennesaw.edu/intech/cooperativelearning.htm

RECIPROCAL TEACHING K-12: Powerful in not only literature classes, but all content areas in meeting the CCSS demands of increasingly complex literature, informational text and foundational reading skills. Research indicates it promotes significant visible learning, a .7 effect size!

THE LITERACY MAIDEN: This is Comprehensive Wiki, with multiple reciprocal teaching resources from reciprocal teaching bookmarks, recording sheets, role cards, and articles explaining reciprocal teaching: K-12    http://literacymalden.wikispaces.com/ReciprocalTeaching

MRS. SANCHEZ’S WEBSITE: This website is a goldmine for Elementary teachers, not only in literacy. Mrs. Sanchez shares hundreds of ideas in all content areas: Her various Reciprocal Teaching Cards and Worksheets could be used for all grade levels and all content areas: http://sanchezclass.com/home.htm

Reciprocal Teaching: Middle School:  http://www.asdk12.org/MiddleLink/HighFive/Reciprocal/

 

 

LITERATURE CIRCLES: "Literature circles provide a way for students to engage in critical thinking and reflection as they read, discuss, and respond to books. Collaboration is at the heart of this approach. Students reshape and add onto their understanding as they construct meaning with other readers. Finally, literature circles guide students to deeper understanding of what they read through structured discussion and extended written and artistic response."

 

inq-circlesINQUIRY CIRCLES IN ACTIONS:  COMPREHENSION AND COLLABORATION, Stephanie Harvie and Harvey Daniels:  Outstanding book promoting reading and how to discuss literature. Inquiry Circles in Action occurs at the intersection of comprehension, collaboration, and inquiry and serves as a guide for teachers who want to realize the benefits of well-structured, student-led, cross-curricular projects

 

 

LITERATURE CIRCLES: For instructions on how to construct literature circles http://olc.spsd.sk.ca/de/pd/instr/strats/literaturecircles/index.html

http://www.eworkshop.on.ca/edu/pdf/Mod17_lit_circ_user_guide.pdf

         Lesson plan on literature circles: from READ WRITE THINK:

http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/literature-circles-getting-started-19.html

 SOCRATIC DIALOGUE/SEMINARS/CIRCLES

MAT COPELAND: SOCRATIC CIRCLES

Socratic seminars enhance reading comprehension, listening and speaking skills, and build a better classroom community. By giving students ownership over the classroom discussion around texts, they become more independent and motivated learners. Matt Copeland has created a coaching guide for both the teacher new to Socratic seminars and the experienced teacher seeking to optimize the benefits of this powerful strategy

 

(PPT] Socratic Circles: Power Point created by the Matt Copeland

www.ksde.org/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=KnyfYA84nHA%3D&...

MATT COPELAND: HIGH SCHOOL SOCRATIC CIRCLES; FOSTERING CRITICAL AND CREATIVE THINKING IN MIDDLE AND HIGH SCHOOL

http://www.amazon.com/dp/1571103945/ref=rdr_ext_tmb

WANDA BALL AND PAM BREWER:
SOCRATIC SEMINARS IN THE BLOCK.

Although designed for schools on block schedule, this includes excellent resources:
http://tinyurl.com/br4m5tf

 

VICTOR MOELLER, MARC MOELLER: SOCRACTIC SEMINARS AND LITERATURE CIRCLES: MIDDLE SCHOOL AND HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH

Many excellent resources to guide all teachers through Socratic Seminars. This book contains lesson plans, student handouts and handy features to help engages students in active learning. These authors received much of their training from the GREAT BOOKS FOUNDATION, (see above).

http://tinyurl.com/cugo8cb

 

 Other Socratic Seminar Resources

 Scholarly explanation of the power of Socratic Seminar across all academic disciplines including math. http://tinyurl.com/cgdht9h

Although this has commercial links, it does provide Informational PowerPoint on The Art of Questioning  http://www.scribd.com/doc/18050611/The-Art-of-QuestioningPpt

Scholarly article on Socratic Method. More geared toward AP, and high school and college.  http://www.socraticmethod.net/

 READING WITH PEN IN HAND:
HOW TO ANNOTATE LITERATURE

Excellent Video capturing CCSS on how to annotate literature using SIFTT Method. https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/sift-method-analyze-literature

While reading at home and in class, students should engage with text with “pen in hand”, through annotation, which demonstrate students’ connections and observations. This activity requires readers to think and express their ideas. Students can write in the margins of their own books, or if they don’t own the book, use either sticky notes or paper. Although traditionally used in advanced placement classes, all students have the ability to think critically about literature.

 

 SIFTT ANNOTATING

 

S – Symbols: A symbol is a literal thing that also stands for something else, like a flag or a cross, or fire. Symbols help to discover new layers of meaning.

 

I – Imagery: Imagery includes words that appeal to one or more of the five senses. Close attention to imagery is important in understanding an author’s message and attitude toward a subject.

F – Figurative Language: Figurative language includes things like similes, metaphors, and personification. Figurative language often reveals deeper layers of meaning.

T – Tone: Tone is the overall mood of a piece of literature. Tone can carry as much meaning to the story as the plot does.

T – Theme: In literature, a theme is a broad idea in a story, or a message or lesson

         conveyed by a work. This message is usually about life, society or human nature. Themes explore timeless and universal ideas. Most themes are implied rather than explicitly stated.

 

Types of Annotations

 

1.Questions and Answers

2.Summary of Main Ideas

3.Character Descriptions

4.Possible Test Questions

5.Patterns / Motifs

6.Personal Connections to Text

7.Explanations of Text

8.Marking Important Passages

9.Connecting to the Big Ideas

 

David Chung: High School Materials

 

Valencia high school teacher provides an amazing collection of reading interaction activities, all for immediate use. Visit his website for many other novel based interaction activities.  http://tinyurl.com/c6vsj6b  

OTHER TEACHERS’ HELPFUL WEBSITES

 

BOOKS FOR STRUGGLING AND RELUCTANT READERS:
http://www.teachmentortexts.com/#axzz238HFAzCe
Created by teacher, Kellee Moye, List of mentor texts, books that can be used to promote literacy. Middle School level.

THE READING LADY: K-5

http://www.readinglady.com/index.php?&MMN_position=1:1

Not as extensive and English Companion, but Readinglady.com provides support to teachers throughout the country. Teachers also use this site to network and share ideas. There are many free resources housed here, along with discussion groups. You are invited to email the author, Laura Kump and share your questions and ideas.